CALL US: (973) 881-0540

Category: Jobs

Developing One of Our Most Important Skills.

Most of the people I know had a great sense of relief and renewed hope when 2020 ended. I am confident that I am not alone in saying it was one of the most challenging years of my life.

Of course, the elephant in the room was the COVID-19 pandemic, but there were other issues that made the year so challenging. Racial and social injustice, excessive force by police against unarmed citizens, economic downturns, and warring political ideologies brought to the surface the division that is present in the country.

The divisiveness that exists in America was on clear display in 2020 and increasingly exploited to a large extent by people in positions of leadership.

I firmly believe one of the primary contributors to the divisiveness that remains a part of American culture is a lack of critical thinking skills. The lack of critical thinking skills leads to being moved by our emotions instead of the facts, and to being manipulated to take actions we might not otherwise take.

Without critical thinking skills, we accept and act on beliefs that have no basis in fact, no evidence or proof, and sometimes, we can become so stubborn that we reach a point where we vehemently reject facts or evidence when presented.

The ability to gather, compare, examine sources, and test information before deciding on courses of action is an essential skill to develop.

Critical thinking skills are also essential in the workforce. This topic is important for educators and my colleagues in workforce development. In terms of the workforce, a recent report “Keys to the Future: Align Workforce Readiness Skills to Ensure Student Success” from the International Data Corporation (IDC) notes:

“The most required skills across all occupations include oral and written communication skills, detail orientation, marketing skills, integrity, and customer-service orientation.”

Critical thinking is an important part of all the skills mentioned.

In further discussing the sets of skills needed in the workforce, the report says:

“This set is more important than any specific technology skill, deep science or math, or even great business skills. This set represents skills that are both important and widely required across positions. And the vast majority of them are ‘soft’ skills that are applicable across a wide variety of occupations. Many of these skills aren’t foreign to most contemporary curricula. In fact, critical and creative thinking, problem solving, teamwork, and detail orientation are relevant across all knowledge and domains.” (underlines mine)

Restating an important point in the report; critical and creative thinking are relevant across all knowledge and domains. This includes both our personal and professional lives.

As a workforce development professional, I have committed to making sure we are including critical thinking skills in all our training programs. Not to tell people what to think, but how to think and make informed decisions. Both personally and professionally.

There will always be different points of view and disagreements on the issues and how to go about changing things; but we owe it to ourselves to seek facts, to find credible evidence for the positions we take, and remain open to changing if additional information becomes available. That is the essence of critical thinking.

Not only is this relevant in the workforce, but it will improve communication and relationships in our personal lives, our communities, and the country.

The views and opinions expressed in this post are those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of the Greater Paterson OIC, its Board of Directors, or any other group or individual affiliated.

The Post: Developing One of Our Most Important Skills appeared first on transformationtraining.net

How to Know You’ve Found Your Ideal Job

When it comes to employment, increasing numbers of people are seeking more from their work than just collecting a paycheck. Finding work that has meaning and value is now high on the list of job seekers today. Having a process to evaluate a great job match is helpful in making that determination. There are 5 key factors that can be used to identify the ideal job. If you find yourself with less than 3 of the 5 it might be a cause for concern, and maybe time to look for a change.

The 5 keys are as follows:

  1. Love What You Do

The first criterion in determining the ideal job is doing work that you love, that you are passionate about, that drives, energizes, and leaves you with a sense of personal satisfaction as you go about completing the daily tasks involved.

  • Love Why You Do It

Having a cause that is bigger than yourself is another critical aspect in determining meaningful work. Why you do something is equally, if not more, important than what you are doing. Knowing why you’re doing what you do provides additional energy and clarity to your work.

  • Love Where You Do It

Fortune magazine annually puts out a list of the best companies to work for. Google, SAS, and Wegmans Food Markets, Inc., are a few companies that have been on that list for multiple years. It’s no coincidence that companies that people enjoy working for achieve high levels of success. When you love your place of employment, and when your work is done in an pleasant environment, the quality of work produced is consistently higher.

  • Love Who You Do It With

In any working environment you are bound to run into someone who rubs you the wrong way. But when you love the people you work with, it makes going to work every day much more enjoyable. Working with a group of like-minded people with a shared vision and purpose adds value and meaning to any work situation.

  • Love Who You Do It For

This alludes back to the “why.” Who are the intended beneficiaries of your work? Who are your customers, clients, constituents (whatever you want to call them); what is the impact you have on their lives? When your work is centered on enhancing the lives of others, every aspect of your work is filled with unbridled vigor and meaning. When all five of these elements are in place, you can feel confident that you’ve found the ideal job. Some might say this isn’t realistic, but I disagree. It’s not common, but there are people enjoying and experiencing all 5 of these key elements in their work, myself included. How many of these can you apply to your current work situation? I would love to know.

By Hollis Nelson

ABOUT US

OIC of Greater Paterson is a non-profit community- based organization that has been meeting the needs of the economically disadvantaged individuals throughout the community. 

CONTACT US

© . Greater Paterson OIC. Website by LoveArts.